Lateral epicondylosis is a common pathology of the upper extremity. The origin of the ECRB is the most commonly cited anatomic location of lateral epicondylosis pathology. Histologic examination shows the features of a failed healing response, with absence of acute inflammatory cells. The typical patient with lateral epicondylosis is an adult in the fourth or fifth decade of life, with no difference about the sex. Diagnosis is based on history and physical examination. The role of imaging is to confirm the diagnosis. The most consistent symptom of lateral epicondylosis is pain over the lateral aspect of the elbow. Therapeutic modalities for lateral epicondylosis vary widely and lack definitive evidence. Open, percutaneous or arthroscopic surgery is recommended when functional disability and pain persist after 6 to 12 months of nonoperative management. Future studies using validated clinical measures and imaging are needed to determine the best management for patients with lateral epicondylosis.

Elbow tendinopathy

Longo UG;
2012-01-01

Abstract

Lateral epicondylosis is a common pathology of the upper extremity. The origin of the ECRB is the most commonly cited anatomic location of lateral epicondylosis pathology. Histologic examination shows the features of a failed healing response, with absence of acute inflammatory cells. The typical patient with lateral epicondylosis is an adult in the fourth or fifth decade of life, with no difference about the sex. Diagnosis is based on history and physical examination. The role of imaging is to confirm the diagnosis. The most consistent symptom of lateral epicondylosis is pain over the lateral aspect of the elbow. Therapeutic modalities for lateral epicondylosis vary widely and lack definitive evidence. Open, percutaneous or arthroscopic surgery is recommended when functional disability and pain persist after 6 to 12 months of nonoperative management. Future studies using validated clinical measures and imaging are needed to determine the best management for patients with lateral epicondylosis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/4942
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