Management of preoperative antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is variable among surgeons: guidelines collide with prejudices because replacement of aspirin with low-molecular-weight heparin is still performed because of a presumed minor bleeding risk. This study aims to analyze postoperative bleedings and complications in patients scheduled for elective primary isolated on-pump CABG, depending on preoperative aspirin treatment or its replacement with enoxaparin. In this cohort study, we propensity score matched 200 patients in whom aspirin was stopped at least 5 days before CABG and replaced with enoxaparin and 200 patients who continued aspirin therapy until the day before surgery. Postoperative bleedings and complications were monitored during hospitalization. Among patients who continued aspirin treatment, mean overall bleeding was 701.0 ± 334.6 ml, whereas in the matched enoxaparin group, it was significantly greater (882.6 ± 64.6 ml, p value <0.001); this was associated with reduced postoperative complications, lower values of postoperative C-reactive protein in aspirin takers, and a presumed protective effect for statins. After propensity score adjustment, aspirin treatment carried a protective effect against major postoperative bleeding (odds ratio 0.312, p = 0.001). In conclusion, postoperative bleeding is reduced in patients who continued aspirin, likely due to a reduction in postoperative inflammation. The practice of empirically discontinuing aspirin and replacing it with enoxaparin before CABG should be abandoned. Patients with coronary artery disease referred to CABG should continue antiplatelet medications until the surgical procedure. Those results might be extended to patients under oral anticoagulant therapy requiring CABG.

Effect of Preoperative Aspirin Replacement With Enoxaparin in Patients Undergoing Primary Isolated On-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

Lusini M;Petitti T;Chello M
2016-01-01

Abstract

Management of preoperative antiplatelet therapy in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is variable among surgeons: guidelines collide with prejudices because replacement of aspirin with low-molecular-weight heparin is still performed because of a presumed minor bleeding risk. This study aims to analyze postoperative bleedings and complications in patients scheduled for elective primary isolated on-pump CABG, depending on preoperative aspirin treatment or its replacement with enoxaparin. In this cohort study, we propensity score matched 200 patients in whom aspirin was stopped at least 5 days before CABG and replaced with enoxaparin and 200 patients who continued aspirin therapy until the day before surgery. Postoperative bleedings and complications were monitored during hospitalization. Among patients who continued aspirin treatment, mean overall bleeding was 701.0 ± 334.6 ml, whereas in the matched enoxaparin group, it was significantly greater (882.6 ± 64.6 ml, p value <0.001); this was associated with reduced postoperative complications, lower values of postoperative C-reactive protein in aspirin takers, and a presumed protective effect for statins. After propensity score adjustment, aspirin treatment carried a protective effect against major postoperative bleeding (odds ratio 0.312, p = 0.001). In conclusion, postoperative bleeding is reduced in patients who continued aspirin, likely due to a reduction in postoperative inflammation. The practice of empirically discontinuing aspirin and replacing it with enoxaparin before CABG should be abandoned. Patients with coronary artery disease referred to CABG should continue antiplatelet medications until the surgical procedure. Those results might be extended to patients under oral anticoagulant therapy requiring CABG.
cardiac surgey; myocardial infarction; antiplatelet therapy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/10848
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