Abstract External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is frequently used in the management of prostate cancer (PCa) as definitive, postoperative, or salvage local treatment. Although EBRT plays a central role in the management of PCa, complications remain a troubling by-product. Several studies have demonstrated an association between radiotherapy and elevated risk of acute and late toxicities. A secondary malignancy induced by initial therapy represents one of the most serious complications related to definitive cancer treatment. The radiation-related secondary primary malignancy risk increases with increasing survival time. Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder is the most frequent secondary primary malignancy occurring after radiotherapy and is described as more aggressive; it may be diagnosed later because some radiation oncologists believe that the hematuria that occurs after prostate EBRT is normal. Some patients treated for localized PCa will subsequently develop invasive bladder cancer requiring surgical intervention. Patients with PCa treated with EBRT should be monitored closely for the presence of bladder cancer.

Bladder Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

Buscarini M
2013-01-01

Abstract

Abstract External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is frequently used in the management of prostate cancer (PCa) as definitive, postoperative, or salvage local treatment. Although EBRT plays a central role in the management of PCa, complications remain a troubling by-product. Several studies have demonstrated an association between radiotherapy and elevated risk of acute and late toxicities. A secondary malignancy induced by initial therapy represents one of the most serious complications related to definitive cancer treatment. The radiation-related secondary primary malignancy risk increases with increasing survival time. Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder is the most frequent secondary primary malignancy occurring after radiotherapy and is described as more aggressive; it may be diagnosed later because some radiation oncologists believe that the hematuria that occurs after prostate EBRT is normal. Some patients treated for localized PCa will subsequently develop invasive bladder cancer requiring surgical intervention. Patients with PCa treated with EBRT should be monitored closely for the presence of bladder cancer.
Bladder cancer, External beam radiotherapy, Prostate cancer, Radiotherapy
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/2843
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact