Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS) procedures for the treatment of spinal pathologies have experienced exponential growth due to improved techniques and decreased trauma to the patient. Several MISS procedures that require the use of a trans-pedicular cannula as a guiding tool for pedicle screw placement, delivery of biomaterials to the vertebral body or injection of biologics to the disc space have been described. Although these are clear advantages of MISS, the limited dissection and exposure may reduce the accuracy and stability of operation and make spine surgeons rely heavily on intraoperative fluoroscopy, raising concerns over the level of radiation exposure. Robot-assisted minimal invasive surgery has aroused more attention for its high precision and stability, minimizing risks of damage to neurovascular structures and diminishing harmful exposure to ionizing radiation. The aim of this paper is to describe and characterize a new surgical positioning system for for robotic assisted MISS. The system is conceived to be integrated in a surgical platform capable of supporting the surgeon in a new procedure to treat degenerative intervertebral disc disease. For this purpose, it is necessary to orientate a cannula in order to guide the bone drill along a planned route, to access the intervertebral disc through the pedicle and endplate. In particular, we describe a mechanism that percutaneously guides a cannula towards the intervertebral disc based on the acquisition of few fluoroscopic images. The design of the positioning system, with its features and constrains imposed by the presence of instrumentation and medical staff in the operating room, as well as the software for trajectory planning during surgery, are here described.

A new surgical positioning system for robotic assisted minimally invasive spine surgery and transpedicular approach to the disc.

Vadalà G;Accoto D;Russo F;Papalia R;Denaro V.
2017-01-01

Abstract

Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS) procedures for the treatment of spinal pathologies have experienced exponential growth due to improved techniques and decreased trauma to the patient. Several MISS procedures that require the use of a trans-pedicular cannula as a guiding tool for pedicle screw placement, delivery of biomaterials to the vertebral body or injection of biologics to the disc space have been described. Although these are clear advantages of MISS, the limited dissection and exposure may reduce the accuracy and stability of operation and make spine surgeons rely heavily on intraoperative fluoroscopy, raising concerns over the level of radiation exposure. Robot-assisted minimal invasive surgery has aroused more attention for its high precision and stability, minimizing risks of damage to neurovascular structures and diminishing harmful exposure to ionizing radiation. The aim of this paper is to describe and characterize a new surgical positioning system for for robotic assisted MISS. The system is conceived to be integrated in a surgical platform capable of supporting the surgeon in a new procedure to treat degenerative intervertebral disc disease. For this purpose, it is necessary to orientate a cannula in order to guide the bone drill along a planned route, to access the intervertebral disc through the pedicle and endplate. In particular, we describe a mechanism that percutaneously guides a cannula towards the intervertebral disc based on the acquisition of few fluoroscopic images. The design of the positioning system, with its features and constrains imposed by the presence of instrumentation and medical staff in the operating room, as well as the software for trajectory planning during surgery, are here described.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/4384
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