OBJECTIVES: Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a genetic generalized epilepsy marked by cortical hyperexcitability. Recent neuroimaging data suggested also a thalamic role in sustaining epileptic propensity in JME. However, thalamic hyperexcitability was not demonstrated so far. Low-frequency (LF-SEPs) and high-frequency somatosensory evoked potentials (HF-SEPs) are very sensitive to thalamic (early HF-SEPs burst, eHFO) and cortical (late HF-SEPs burst, lHFO) excitability. The aim of our experiment was to explore and discern the role of thalamic and cortical excitability in epileptic susceptibility of JME through a LF-SEPs and HF-SEPs study. METHODS: Twenty-three subjects with JME (11 females, 30.2 ± 9.8-year-old) and 23 healthy control subjects (12 females, age: 34.7 ± 7.7-year-old) underwent right median LF-SEPs scalp recordings. Cp3'-Fz traces were filtered (400-800 Hz) to reveal HF-SEPs. All JME patients were on drug treatment and seizure free, except for sporadic myoclonus. RESULTS: N20 LF-SEPs amplitude (p < 0.009), areas of totHFO, eHFO and lHFO (all p < 0.005) and totHFO duration (p = 0.013) were increased in JME respect to healthy subjects. totHFO area was negatively correlated with the number of antiepileptic drugs (rho = -0.505, sig.: 0.027), while eHFO area was positively correlated with the myoclonus frequency (rho = 0.555, sig = 0.014). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that in JME the thalamic hyperexcitability assists the cortical one in sustaining epileptic susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the concept of JME as a network and genetic disorder.

Thalamic and cortical hyperexcitability in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

Assenza Giovanni;Boscarino Marilisa;Tombini Mario;Di Lazzaro V
2020-01-01

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a genetic generalized epilepsy marked by cortical hyperexcitability. Recent neuroimaging data suggested also a thalamic role in sustaining epileptic propensity in JME. However, thalamic hyperexcitability was not demonstrated so far. Low-frequency (LF-SEPs) and high-frequency somatosensory evoked potentials (HF-SEPs) are very sensitive to thalamic (early HF-SEPs burst, eHFO) and cortical (late HF-SEPs burst, lHFO) excitability. The aim of our experiment was to explore and discern the role of thalamic and cortical excitability in epileptic susceptibility of JME through a LF-SEPs and HF-SEPs study. METHODS: Twenty-three subjects with JME (11 females, 30.2 ± 9.8-year-old) and 23 healthy control subjects (12 females, age: 34.7 ± 7.7-year-old) underwent right median LF-SEPs scalp recordings. Cp3'-Fz traces were filtered (400-800 Hz) to reveal HF-SEPs. All JME patients were on drug treatment and seizure free, except for sporadic myoclonus. RESULTS: N20 LF-SEPs amplitude (p < 0.009), areas of totHFO, eHFO and lHFO (all p < 0.005) and totHFO duration (p = 0.013) were increased in JME respect to healthy subjects. totHFO area was negatively correlated with the number of antiepileptic drugs (rho = -0.505, sig.: 0.027), while eHFO area was positively correlated with the myoclonus frequency (rho = 0.555, sig = 0.014). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that in JME the thalamic hyperexcitability assists the cortical one in sustaining epileptic susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE: Our results support the concept of JME as a network and genetic disorder.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/4515
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