The implementation of hospital-wide Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) is still an unsolved quest for many hospital managers. EMRs have long been considered a key factor for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing adverse events for patients, decreasing costs, optimizing processes, improving clinical research and obtaining best clinical performances. However, hospitals continue to experience resistance from professionals to accepting EMRs. This study combines institutional and individual factors to explain which determinants can trigger or inhibit the EMRs implementation in hospitals, and which variables managers can exploit to guide professionals’ behaviours. Data have been collected through a survey administered to physicians and nurses in an Italian University Hospital in Rome. A total of 114 high-quality responses had been received. Results show that both, physicians and nurses, expect many benefits from the use of EMRs. In particular, it is believed that the EMRs will have a positive impact on quality, efficiency and effectiveness of care; handover communication between healthcare workers; teaching, tutoring and research activities; greater control of your own business. Moreover, data show an interplay between individual and institutional determinants: normative factors directly affect perceived usefulness (C = 0.30 **), perceived ease of use (C = 0.26 **) and intention to use EMRs (C = 0.33 **), regulative factors affect the intention to use EMRs (C = -0.21 **), and perceived usefulness directly affect the intention to use EMRs (C = 0.33 **). The analysis carried out shows that the key determinants of the intention to use EMRs are the normative ones (peer influence) and the individual ones (perceived usefulness), and that perceived usefulness works also as a mediator between normative factors and intention to use EMRs. Therefore, Management can leverage on power users to motivate, generate and manage change. © 2020 De Benedictis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Electronic Medical Records implementation in hospital: An empirical investigation of individual and organizational determinants

De Benedictis A;Tartaglini D
2020-01-01

Abstract

The implementation of hospital-wide Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) is still an unsolved quest for many hospital managers. EMRs have long been considered a key factor for improving healthcare quality and safety, reducing adverse events for patients, decreasing costs, optimizing processes, improving clinical research and obtaining best clinical performances. However, hospitals continue to experience resistance from professionals to accepting EMRs. This study combines institutional and individual factors to explain which determinants can trigger or inhibit the EMRs implementation in hospitals, and which variables managers can exploit to guide professionals’ behaviours. Data have been collected through a survey administered to physicians and nurses in an Italian University Hospital in Rome. A total of 114 high-quality responses had been received. Results show that both, physicians and nurses, expect many benefits from the use of EMRs. In particular, it is believed that the EMRs will have a positive impact on quality, efficiency and effectiveness of care; handover communication between healthcare workers; teaching, tutoring and research activities; greater control of your own business. Moreover, data show an interplay between individual and institutional determinants: normative factors directly affect perceived usefulness (C = 0.30 **), perceived ease of use (C = 0.26 **) and intention to use EMRs (C = 0.33 **), regulative factors affect the intention to use EMRs (C = -0.21 **), and perceived usefulness directly affect the intention to use EMRs (C = 0.33 **). The analysis carried out shows that the key determinants of the intention to use EMRs are the normative ones (peer influence) and the individual ones (perceived usefulness), and that perceived usefulness works also as a mediator between normative factors and intention to use EMRs. Therefore, Management can leverage on power users to motivate, generate and manage change. © 2020 De Benedictis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/5703
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