The most common etiology of acute glomerulonephritis in children is post-infectious glomerulonephritis. Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) is not the only pathogen with the ability to cause post-infectious glomerulonephritis [1]. A lot of cases due to various bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents have been reported in the pediatric literature and antigens generated by these infections in the glomeruli of patients have been identified. The best known, besides Streptococcus, are associations with Hepatitis B and C, Epstein-Barr, HIV, Herpes simplex, Cytomegalovirus, and with some parasites (Toxoplasma, Plasmodium falciparum). Moreover, the authors of some recent case reports have described the possible relationships with Adenovirus, Parvovirus B19, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Influenza A virus. Some patients with these infections present with secondary nephrotic syndrome and the diagnostic criteria include clinical and laboratory data and molecular analysis of tissue [2].We report the case of a 5-year-old boy, presenting with post-infectious glomerulonephritis associated with Rotavirus infection, who developed a steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome with severe scrotal edema.

Post-infectious glomerulonephritis with nephrotic syndrome secondary to rotavirus infection

Ferrara, Pietro;
2013-01-01

Abstract

The most common etiology of acute glomerulonephritis in children is post-infectious glomerulonephritis. Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) is not the only pathogen with the ability to cause post-infectious glomerulonephritis [1]. A lot of cases due to various bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents have been reported in the pediatric literature and antigens generated by these infections in the glomeruli of patients have been identified. The best known, besides Streptococcus, are associations with Hepatitis B and C, Epstein-Barr, HIV, Herpes simplex, Cytomegalovirus, and with some parasites (Toxoplasma, Plasmodium falciparum). Moreover, the authors of some recent case reports have described the possible relationships with Adenovirus, Parvovirus B19, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Influenza A virus. Some patients with these infections present with secondary nephrotic syndrome and the diagnostic criteria include clinical and laboratory data and molecular analysis of tissue [2].We report the case of a 5-year-old boy, presenting with post-infectious glomerulonephritis associated with Rotavirus infection, who developed a steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome with severe scrotal edema.
Nephrotic syndrome; Post-infectious glomerulonephritis; Rotavirus infection
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/5816
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