Sensory feedback is pivotal for a proficient dexterity of the hand. By modulating the grip force in function of the quick and not completely predictable change of the load force, grabbed objects are prevented to slip from the hand. Slippage control is an enabling achievement to all manipulation abilities. However, in hand prosthetics, the performance of even the most innovative research solutions proposed so far to control slippage remain distant from the human physiology. Indeed, slippage control involves parallel and compensatory activation of multiple mechanoceptors, spinal and supraspinal reflexes, and higher-order voluntary behavioral adjustments. In this work, we reviewed the literature on physiological correlates of slippage to propose a three-phases model for the slip sensation and reaction. Furthermore, we discuss the main strategies employed so far in the research studies that tried to restore slippage control in amputees. In the light of the proposed three-phase slippage model and from the weaknesses of already implemented solutions, we proposed several physiology-inspired solutions for slippage control to be implemented in the future hand prostheses. Understanding the physiological basis of slip detection and perception and implementing them in novel hand feedback system would make prosthesis manipulation more efficient and would boost its perceived naturalness, fostering the sense of agency for the hand movements.

Neurophysiology of slip sensation and grip reaction: Insights for hand prosthesis control of slippage

D'Alonzo M.;Di Pino G.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Sensory feedback is pivotal for a proficient dexterity of the hand. By modulating the grip force in function of the quick and not completely predictable change of the load force, grabbed objects are prevented to slip from the hand. Slippage control is an enabling achievement to all manipulation abilities. However, in hand prosthetics, the performance of even the most innovative research solutions proposed so far to control slippage remain distant from the human physiology. Indeed, slippage control involves parallel and compensatory activation of multiple mechanoceptors, spinal and supraspinal reflexes, and higher-order voluntary behavioral adjustments. In this work, we reviewed the literature on physiological correlates of slippage to propose a three-phases model for the slip sensation and reaction. Furthermore, we discuss the main strategies employed so far in the research studies that tried to restore slippage control in amputees. In the light of the proposed three-phase slippage model and from the weaknesses of already implemented solutions, we proposed several physiology-inspired solutions for slippage control to be implemented in the future hand prostheses. Understanding the physiological basis of slip detection and perception and implementing them in novel hand feedback system would make prosthesis manipulation more efficient and would boost its perceived naturalness, fostering the sense of agency for the hand movements.
2021
Physiology of slippage
Reflexes
Sensorimotor control loop
Touch
Upper limb prostheses
Brain
Hand
Humans
Touch Perception
Artificial Limbs
Hand Strength
Psychomotor Performance
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/66178
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