Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is the mainstream treatment for drug-refractory cardiac fibrillation. Multiple studies demonstrated that incorrect dosage of radiofrequency energy to the myocardium could lead to uncontrolled tissue damage or treatment failure, with the consequent need for unplanned reoperations. Monitoring tissue temperature during thermal therapy and predicting the extent of lesions may improve treatment efficacy. Cardiac computational modeling represents a viable tool for identifying optimal RFCA settings, though predictability issues still limit a widespread usage of such a technology in clinical scenarios. We aim to fill this gap by assessing the influence of the intrinsic myocardial microstructure on the thermo-electric behavior at the tissue level. By performing multi-point temperature measurements on ex-vivo swine cardiac tissue samples, the experimental characterization of myocardial thermal anisotropy allowed us to assemble a fine-tuned thermo-electric material model of the cardiac tissue. We implemented a multiphysics and multiscale computational framework, encompassing thermo-electric anisotropic conduction, phase-lagging for heat transfer, and a three-state dynamical system for cellular death and lesion estimation. Our analysis resulted in a remarkable agreement between ex-vivo measurements and numerical results. Accordingly, we identified myocardium anisotropy as the driving effect on the outcomes of hyperthermic treatments. Furthermore, we characterized the complex nonlinear couplings regulating tissue behavior during RFCA, discussing model calibration, limitations, and perspectives.

Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling of Anisotropic Cardiac RFCA: Experimental-Based Model Calibration via Multi-Point Temperature Measurements

Massaroni C.;Filippi S.;Gizzi A.
;
Schena E.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is the mainstream treatment for drug-refractory cardiac fibrillation. Multiple studies demonstrated that incorrect dosage of radiofrequency energy to the myocardium could lead to uncontrolled tissue damage or treatment failure, with the consequent need for unplanned reoperations. Monitoring tissue temperature during thermal therapy and predicting the extent of lesions may improve treatment efficacy. Cardiac computational modeling represents a viable tool for identifying optimal RFCA settings, though predictability issues still limit a widespread usage of such a technology in clinical scenarios. We aim to fill this gap by assessing the influence of the intrinsic myocardial microstructure on the thermo-electric behavior at the tissue level. By performing multi-point temperature measurements on ex-vivo swine cardiac tissue samples, the experimental characterization of myocardial thermal anisotropy allowed us to assemble a fine-tuned thermo-electric material model of the cardiac tissue. We implemented a multiphysics and multiscale computational framework, encompassing thermo-electric anisotropic conduction, phase-lagging for heat transfer, and a three-state dynamical system for cellular death and lesion estimation. Our analysis resulted in a remarkable agreement between ex-vivo measurements and numerical results. Accordingly, we identified myocardium anisotropy as the driving effect on the outcomes of hyperthermic treatments. Furthermore, we characterized the complex nonlinear couplings regulating tissue behavior during RFCA, discussing model calibration, limitations, and perspectives.
fiber Bragg grating sensors
finite element analysis
hyperthermal tissue damage
myocardial anisotropy
radiofrequency ablation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/67255
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