Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine if “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesions in patients with dynamic anteroinferior instability were transformed into “on-track” lesions using iliac bone autografts with screw fixation. The secondary purpose was to observe if postoperative bony remodeling would occur over time, resulting in recurrent “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesions with corresponding instability. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and CT records of 8 patients with an “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesion who underwent open anatomical glenoid reconstruction with an iliac crest bone autograft. Hill-Sachs lesions, glenoid track widths, and glenoid surface areas were measured on a preoperative and two postoperative (6 weeks, ≥ 2 years) 3D-CT models to determine graft resorption over time. All patients were available for postoperative clinical and CT final follow-up 3 years (2–4 years) postoperatively. Results: In all patients, the Hill-Sachs lesions were “on-track” 6 weeks postoperatively and remained “on-track” at final-follow-up. Compared to preoperative values, the glenoid track width and glenoid surface area both were higher 6 weeks postoperatively (p < 0.001 and p = 0.023, respectively) and at final follow-up (p < 0.001 and p = 0.023, respectively). Whereas the glenoid track width between 6 weeks and final follow-up showed no decrease (p = 0.234), glenoid surface area tended to decrease (p = 0.055). The median SSV was 93 points (85–95 points), the Rowe score 90 points (80–100 points) and the WOSI 1980 points (1783–2067 points) at final follow-up. No recurrent dislocations or subluxations were observed. Conclusions: An open anatomical glenoid reconstruction with an iliac crest bone autograft technique using screw fixation effectively transformed “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesions to “on-track” lesions, resulting in good short-term clinical outcomes. Whereas glenoid surface area tended to be reduced by bony remodeling processes over time, the glenoid track width did not decrease at final follow-up and consequently no recurrence of “off-track” lesions occurred. Level of evidence: Case series; Level of evidence, IV.

Open anatomical glenoid reconstruction with an iliac crest bone autograft effectively resolves off-track Hill-Sachs lesions to on-track lesions

Longo U. G.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine if “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesions in patients with dynamic anteroinferior instability were transformed into “on-track” lesions using iliac bone autografts with screw fixation. The secondary purpose was to observe if postoperative bony remodeling would occur over time, resulting in recurrent “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesions with corresponding instability. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and CT records of 8 patients with an “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesion who underwent open anatomical glenoid reconstruction with an iliac crest bone autograft. Hill-Sachs lesions, glenoid track widths, and glenoid surface areas were measured on a preoperative and two postoperative (6 weeks, ≥ 2 years) 3D-CT models to determine graft resorption over time. All patients were available for postoperative clinical and CT final follow-up 3 years (2–4 years) postoperatively. Results: In all patients, the Hill-Sachs lesions were “on-track” 6 weeks postoperatively and remained “on-track” at final-follow-up. Compared to preoperative values, the glenoid track width and glenoid surface area both were higher 6 weeks postoperatively (p < 0.001 and p = 0.023, respectively) and at final follow-up (p < 0.001 and p = 0.023, respectively). Whereas the glenoid track width between 6 weeks and final follow-up showed no decrease (p = 0.234), glenoid surface area tended to decrease (p = 0.055). The median SSV was 93 points (85–95 points), the Rowe score 90 points (80–100 points) and the WOSI 1980 points (1783–2067 points) at final follow-up. No recurrent dislocations or subluxations were observed. Conclusions: An open anatomical glenoid reconstruction with an iliac crest bone autograft technique using screw fixation effectively transformed “off-track” Hill-Sachs lesions to “on-track” lesions, resulting in good short-term clinical outcomes. Whereas glenoid surface area tended to be reduced by bony remodeling processes over time, the glenoid track width did not decrease at final follow-up and consequently no recurrence of “off-track” lesions occurred. Level of evidence: Case series; Level of evidence, IV.
Glenoid track
Hill-Sachs lesion
Iliac crest autograft
Open glenoid reconstruction
“off-track” lesion
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/67482
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact