Increasing evidence coming from both experimental and humans' studies strongly suggest the existence of a link between epilepsy, in particular temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with mild cognitive impairment and AD are more prone to have seizures, and seizures seem to facilitate amyloid-beta and tau deposits, thus promoting neurodegenerative processes. Consistent with this view, long-lasting drug-resistant TLE and AD have been shown to share several pathological and neuroimaging features. Even if studies addressing prevalence of interictal and subclinical epileptiform activity in these patients are not yet conclusive, their findings raise the possibility that epileptiform activity might negatively impact memory and hasten cognitive decline, either directly or by association with unrecognized silent seizures. In addition, data about detrimental effect of network hyperexcitability in temporal regions in the premorbid and early stages of AD open up new therapeutic opportunities for antiseizure medications and/or antiepileptic strategies that might complement or enhance existing therapies, and potentially modify disease progression. Here we provide a review of evidence linking epileptiform activity, network hyperexcitability, and AD, and their role promoting and accelerating neurodegenerative process. Finally, the effects of antiseizure medications on cognition and their optimal administration in patients with AD are summarized.

Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Alzheimer's Disease: From Preclinical to Clinical Evidence of a Strong Association

Tombini, Mario
;
Assenza, Giovanni;Boscarino, Marilisa;Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo
2021-01-01

Abstract

Increasing evidence coming from both experimental and humans' studies strongly suggest the existence of a link between epilepsy, in particular temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with mild cognitive impairment and AD are more prone to have seizures, and seizures seem to facilitate amyloid-beta and tau deposits, thus promoting neurodegenerative processes. Consistent with this view, long-lasting drug-resistant TLE and AD have been shown to share several pathological and neuroimaging features. Even if studies addressing prevalence of interictal and subclinical epileptiform activity in these patients are not yet conclusive, their findings raise the possibility that epileptiform activity might negatively impact memory and hasten cognitive decline, either directly or by association with unrecognized silent seizures. In addition, data about detrimental effect of network hyperexcitability in temporal regions in the premorbid and early stages of AD open up new therapeutic opportunities for antiseizure medications and/or antiepileptic strategies that might complement or enhance existing therapies, and potentially modify disease progression. Here we provide a review of evidence linking epileptiform activity, network hyperexcitability, and AD, and their role promoting and accelerating neurodegenerative process. Finally, the effects of antiseizure medications on cognition and their optimal administration in patients with AD are summarized.
2021
Alzheimer’s disease; antiseizure medications; cognition; epilepsy; epileptiform activity; network hyperexcitability
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/69967
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