IntroductionSystemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is associated to an increased prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MeS) and to a reduction of Quality of Life (QoL). The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between MeS and QoL in SLE.MethodsSLE patients were consecutively enrolled in a cross sectional study. MeS was defined according to IFD definition. Therapy with glucocorticoids (GC) and antimalarial was analyzed as cumulative years of exposure. We used a cut off of 7.5 mg of prednisone to define high daily dose of GC. QoL was quantified using SF-36. We used BDI and HAM-H to assess symptoms of mood disorders. Fatigue was evaluated using Facit-Fatigue, physical activity using IPAQ, sleep quality using PSQI and alexithymia using TAS-20.ResultsWe enrolled 100 SLE patients. MeS prevalence was 34%. Patients with MeS presented reduced scores in SF-36 MCS and PCS compared to patients without MeS (p 0.03 and p 0.004). BDI and HAM-H score were significantly higher in patients meeting MeS criteria compared to subjects without MeS (p 0.004, p 0.02). These results were confirmed after adjustment for confounders. Compared to patients without MeS, those with MeS presented higher age, lower education level, higher recent SELENA-SLEDAI, higher number of flares, increased SDI, longer cumulative exposure to high dose GC and shorter duration of antimalarial therapy. In the multiple logistic regression model, the variable associated to the Odds Ratio of having MeS were: the average of recent SELENA-SLEDAI (OR 1.15 p 0.04), the years of exposure to high dose of GC (OR 1.18 p 0.004), the years of exposure to antimalarials (OR 0.82 p 0.03) and the BDI score (OR 1.1 p 0.005).ConclusionA modern management of SLE should not miss to take all the possible measures to ensure an adequate QoL to SLE patients, with particular attention to those affected by MeS.

The relation between, metabolic syndrome and quality of life in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Navarini, Luca;Afeltra, Antonella
2017-01-01

Abstract

IntroductionSystemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is associated to an increased prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome (MeS) and to a reduction of Quality of Life (QoL). The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between MeS and QoL in SLE.MethodsSLE patients were consecutively enrolled in a cross sectional study. MeS was defined according to IFD definition. Therapy with glucocorticoids (GC) and antimalarial was analyzed as cumulative years of exposure. We used a cut off of 7.5 mg of prednisone to define high daily dose of GC. QoL was quantified using SF-36. We used BDI and HAM-H to assess symptoms of mood disorders. Fatigue was evaluated using Facit-Fatigue, physical activity using IPAQ, sleep quality using PSQI and alexithymia using TAS-20.ResultsWe enrolled 100 SLE patients. MeS prevalence was 34%. Patients with MeS presented reduced scores in SF-36 MCS and PCS compared to patients without MeS (p 0.03 and p 0.004). BDI and HAM-H score were significantly higher in patients meeting MeS criteria compared to subjects without MeS (p 0.004, p 0.02). These results were confirmed after adjustment for confounders. Compared to patients without MeS, those with MeS presented higher age, lower education level, higher recent SELENA-SLEDAI, higher number of flares, increased SDI, longer cumulative exposure to high dose GC and shorter duration of antimalarial therapy. In the multiple logistic regression model, the variable associated to the Odds Ratio of having MeS were: the average of recent SELENA-SLEDAI (OR 1.15 p 0.04), the years of exposure to high dose of GC (OR 1.18 p 0.004), the years of exposure to antimalarials (OR 0.82 p 0.03) and the BDI score (OR 1.1 p 0.005).ConclusionA modern management of SLE should not miss to take all the possible measures to ensure an adequate QoL to SLE patients, with particular attention to those affected by MeS.
Adult; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Male; Metabolic Syndrome; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Probability; Surveys and Questionnaires; Quality of Life
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/70502
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