Metastatic lesions compromise the mechanical integrity of vertebrae, increasing the fracture risk. Screw fixation is usually performed to guarantee spinal stability and prevent dramatic fracture events. Accordingly, predicting the overall mechanical response in such conditions is critical to planning and optimizing surgical treatment. This work proposes an image-based finite element computational approach describing the mechanical behavior of a patient-specific instrumented metastatic vertebra by assessing the effect of lesion size, location, type, and shape on the fracture load and fracture patterns under physiological loading conditions. A specific constitutive model for metastasis is integrated to account for the effect of the diseased tissue on the bone material properties. Computational results demonstrate that size, location, and type of metastasis significantly affect the overall vertebral mechanical response and suggest a better way to account for these parameters in estimating the fracture risk. Combining multiple osteolytic lesions to account for the irregular shape of the overall metastatic tissue does not significantly affect the vertebra fracture load. In addition, the combination of loading mode and metastasis type is shown for the first time as a critical modeling parameter in determining fracture risk. The proposed computational approach moves toward defining a clinically integrated tool to improve the management of metastatic vertebrae and quantitatively evaluate fracture risk.

Osteolytic vs. Osteoblastic Metastatic Lesion: Computational Modeling of the Mechanical Behavior in the Human Vertebra after Screws Fixation Procedure

Bianchi, Daniele;Gizzi, Alessio
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Metastatic lesions compromise the mechanical integrity of vertebrae, increasing the fracture risk. Screw fixation is usually performed to guarantee spinal stability and prevent dramatic fracture events. Accordingly, predicting the overall mechanical response in such conditions is critical to planning and optimizing surgical treatment. This work proposes an image-based finite element computational approach describing the mechanical behavior of a patient-specific instrumented metastatic vertebra by assessing the effect of lesion size, location, type, and shape on the fracture load and fracture patterns under physiological loading conditions. A specific constitutive model for metastasis is integrated to account for the effect of the diseased tissue on the bone material properties. Computational results demonstrate that size, location, and type of metastasis significantly affect the overall vertebral mechanical response and suggest a better way to account for these parameters in estimating the fracture risk. Combining multiple osteolytic lesions to account for the irregular shape of the overall metastatic tissue does not significantly affect the vertebra fracture load. In addition, the combination of loading mode and metastasis type is shown for the first time as a critical modeling parameter in determining fracture risk. The proposed computational approach moves toward defining a clinically integrated tool to improve the management of metastatic vertebrae and quantitatively evaluate fracture risk.
Bonemetastasis interaction; constitutive modeling; finite element analysis; fracture risk; lytic lesions; metastatic vertebra; osteoblastic lesions
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/70543
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