Proprioception plays a key role in moving our body dexterously and effortlessly. Nevertheless, the majority of investigations evaluating the benefits of providing supplemental feedback to prosthetics users focus on delivering touch restitution. These studies evaluate the influence of touch sensation in an attempt to improve the controllability of current robotic devices. Contrarily, investigations evaluating the capabilities of proprioceptive supplemental feedback have yet to be comprehensively analyzed to the same extent, marking a major gap in knowledge within the current research climate. The non-invasive strategies employed so far to restitute proprioception are reviewed in this work. In the absence of a clearly superior strategy, approaches employing vibrotactile, electrotactile and skin-stretch stimulation achieved better and more consistent results, considering both kinesthetic and grip force information, compared with other strategies or any incidental feedback. Although emulating the richness of the physiological sensory return through artificial feedback is the primary hurdle, measuring its effects to eventually support the integration of cumbersome and energy intensive hardware into commercial prosthetic devices could represent an even greater challenge. Thus, we analyze the strengths and limitations of previous studies and discuss the possible benefits of coupling objective measures, like neurophysiological parameters, as well as measures of prosthesis embodiment and cognitive load with behavioral measures of performance. Such insights aim to provide additional and collateral outcomes to be considered in the experimental design of future investigations of proprioception restitution that could, in the end, allow researchers to gain a more detailed understanding of possibly similar behavioral results and, thus, support one strategy over another.

Integration of proprioception in upper limb prostheses through non-invasive strategies: a review

Papaleo, Ermanno Donato;D'Alonzo, Marco;Fiori, Francesca;Piombino, Valeria;Pilato, Fabio;Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo;Di Pino, Giovanni
2023-01-01

Abstract

Proprioception plays a key role in moving our body dexterously and effortlessly. Nevertheless, the majority of investigations evaluating the benefits of providing supplemental feedback to prosthetics users focus on delivering touch restitution. These studies evaluate the influence of touch sensation in an attempt to improve the controllability of current robotic devices. Contrarily, investigations evaluating the capabilities of proprioceptive supplemental feedback have yet to be comprehensively analyzed to the same extent, marking a major gap in knowledge within the current research climate. The non-invasive strategies employed so far to restitute proprioception are reviewed in this work. In the absence of a clearly superior strategy, approaches employing vibrotactile, electrotactile and skin-stretch stimulation achieved better and more consistent results, considering both kinesthetic and grip force information, compared with other strategies or any incidental feedback. Although emulating the richness of the physiological sensory return through artificial feedback is the primary hurdle, measuring its effects to eventually support the integration of cumbersome and energy intensive hardware into commercial prosthetic devices could represent an even greater challenge. Thus, we analyze the strengths and limitations of previous studies and discuss the possible benefits of coupling objective measures, like neurophysiological parameters, as well as measures of prosthesis embodiment and cognitive load with behavioral measures of performance. Such insights aim to provide additional and collateral outcomes to be considered in the experimental design of future investigations of proprioception restitution that could, in the end, allow researchers to gain a more detailed understanding of possibly similar behavioral results and, thus, support one strategy over another.
2023
Non-invasive feedback; Proprioception; Prosthetics; Upper-limb amputation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/76363
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