The pattern of neuronal discharge within the basal ganglia is disturbed in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In particular, there is a tendency for neuronal elements to synchronise at around 20 Hz in the absence of dopaminergic treatment, whereas this activity can be replaced by spontaneous synchronisation at much higher frequencies (>70 Hz) following dopaminergic treatment [J. Neurosci. 21 (2001) 1033; Brain 126 (2003) 2153]. In two PD patients (3 sides), we show that stimulating the subthalamic area at around 20 Hz exacerbates synchronisation at similar frequencies in the globus pallidus interna, the major output structure of the human basal ganglia. In contrast, stimulating the subthalamic area at >70 Hz suppresses pallidal activity at about 20 Hz. Clinically, stimulation of the subthalamic area at similar high frequencies reverses parkinsonism and forms the basis of therapeutic deep brain stimulation in PD. The results point to a possible common mechanism by which both dopaminergic treatment associated synchronisation of subthalamic activity at very high frequency and synchronisation imposed by therapeutic stimulation of the subthalamic area inhibit an abnormal and potentially deleterious synchronisation of basal ganglia output at around 20 Hz. If this activity is unchecked by synchronisation at higher frequency, then pathological 20-Hz oscillations may cascade through the basal ganglia, increasing at subsequent levels of processing.

Effects of stimulation of the subthalamic area on oscillatory pallidal activity in Parkinson's disease

PILATO F;DI LAZZARO V
2004-01-01

Abstract

The pattern of neuronal discharge within the basal ganglia is disturbed in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In particular, there is a tendency for neuronal elements to synchronise at around 20 Hz in the absence of dopaminergic treatment, whereas this activity can be replaced by spontaneous synchronisation at much higher frequencies (>70 Hz) following dopaminergic treatment [J. Neurosci. 21 (2001) 1033; Brain 126 (2003) 2153]. In two PD patients (3 sides), we show that stimulating the subthalamic area at around 20 Hz exacerbates synchronisation at similar frequencies in the globus pallidus interna, the major output structure of the human basal ganglia. In contrast, stimulating the subthalamic area at >70 Hz suppresses pallidal activity at about 20 Hz. Clinically, stimulation of the subthalamic area at similar high frequencies reverses parkinsonism and forms the basis of therapeutic deep brain stimulation in PD. The results point to a possible common mechanism by which both dopaminergic treatment associated synchronisation of subthalamic activity at very high frequency and synchronisation imposed by therapeutic stimulation of the subthalamic area inhibit an abnormal and potentially deleterious synchronisation of basal ganglia output at around 20 Hz. If this activity is unchecked by synchronisation at higher frequency, then pathological 20-Hz oscillations may cascade through the basal ganglia, increasing at subsequent levels of processing.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12610/7818
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 203
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact